amy cuddy

Amy Cuddy: How To Be In Charge Of Your Own Happiness

In Self Esteem by Interconnected Lives

Like Amy Cuddy, every one of us has a dream and that is to be happy and successful while doing what we love. So why do only a minority of individuals attain it?

What happens to the rest? We all want the same thing, but only some people work really hard to succeed. While there are some who sit at home praying to God hoping for miracles to unfold and expect things to happen, others take charge of their life.

Remember that whatever your goals are, only you are in charge of them.

One thing must always be remembered; success comes to those who make the effort. Never expect to be successful if you are not doing your part.

Many of the successful people you admire and envy today have striven hard to flourish, in the past. It did not come easy to them and it definitely did not occur overnight either.

One must need to endure the pain to be successful. Simply put – No pain, no gain. Do not let any negativity seep in to your mind. Be strong and shun all pessimism around you. This is one of the key ingredients for a successful life.

Amy Cuddy – ‘No matter what people tell you or do to you, keep your head straight, fake a smile and move on’

Born in 1972, Amy Cuddy was a gifted ballet dancer. She was a second year university student in theatre and American history, but with just one incident in her life, everything changed drastically for her.

At the age of 19 Amy Cuddy’s life took a whole new turn. One morning in 1992, while returning from Montana with her colleagues, Amy suffered a car accident that hurled her out of the side window. She had to be rushed to the hospital due to a severe head injury—a harrowing brain damage.

Trending Now:  Dharma Teachings: How I Regained my Self-Confidence

Amy Cuddy’s brain was critically damaged and the doctors could not do much for her. She was told that she only had a slim chance of completing her college education and that her IQ level had plummeted by 30 points.

Later, Amy began to experience difficulties in reading, concentrating and processing information. Much to her disappointment, she was no longer able to dance like she used to.